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Patients Posts on Medivizor

Why Speaking Up Matters And Why It Is Difficult

Why Speaking Up Matters And Why It Is Difficult

Posted by on Aug 14, 2019 in Blog | 2 comments

Recently researchers added a question to a common survey that patients can complete after they are discharged from the hospital. The question – “How often did you feel comfortable speaking up if you had any problems in your care?” available answers included: “(1) no problems during hospitalization, (2) always felt comfortable...

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Guest Post: An Open Letter To Healthcare Providers

Guest Post: An Open Letter To Healthcare Providers

Posted by on Jun 30, 2017 in Blog | 9 comments

By Stephanie Zimmerman, RN, MSN Dear Healthcare Providers, Although professionally, I am a former pediatric oncology nurse practitioner, I write this letter as an individual who lives with the long-lasting impact of late effects stemming from the successful treatment of Ewing’s Sarcoma as a child in the late 1970’s. I write because I am fortunate to be...

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15 Tips to Cope with Scanxiety (Scan Anxiety)

15 Tips to Cope with Scanxiety (Scan Anxiety)

Posted by on Jun 3, 2014 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, Leukemia, Lung cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Prostate cancer | 4 comments

“Keep Calm And Carry On:” Really? “The shock of that day you hear the words, ‘you have cancer’ never leaves you and your sense of certainty in life and in your body can be hard to recapture after a diagnosis of cancer.”-Marie Ennis-O’Connor After Surgery, Chemo, Radiation This is the time when feeling sick is supposed to be over. ...

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7 Reasons Why Patients Blog

7 Reasons Why Patients Blog

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Coronary artery disease, Diabetes mellitus, Hypertension, Infertility, Lung cancer, Melanoma, Prostate cancer, Stroke | 11 comments

Why do patients blog? Why do they reveal personal information and medical experiences on the Internet? 1) To Share Information Annette McKinnon, author of ‘Here’s Your Gold Watch, Rheutired,’ started her blog “to inform people about things I learned that seem obvious to me now, but were hard to learn.” Carolyn Thomas, author of “My Heart...

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Beep…beep…beep…

Beep…beep…beep…

Posted by on Feb 28, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Anyone who has spent anytime in a hospital has heard the cacophony. Monitor alarms are actually messages to nurses and physicians; some are crisis, some warning, some just advisory alarms. Here’s one patient’s response… Annoying beeps, buzzers, tones and other noises make sleeping nearly impossible and even just resting difficult.  But, patients...

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Bullying in Nursing and Its Impact on Care

Bullying in Nursing and Its Impact on Care

Posted by on Jan 30, 2014 in Blog | 11 comments

Do nurses eat their young? Renee Thompson asks.  The answer may surprise you.   “Nurses know we eat our young.  Some nurses think it’s good to “toughen up” the new nurses. In reality it’s not. It decreases confidence and competence. “ Renee Thompson, nurse, author, educator and advocate for workplace change, is making it her...

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Why I Became a Patient Engagement Evangelist

Why I Became a Patient Engagement Evangelist

Posted by on Dec 12, 2013 in Blog | 11 comments

Physician Parents When your parents are both physicians, you have a unique perspective on the health care system.  This is especially true for me because of the time when I grew up. During those days, on call physicians didn’t leave the phone calls to an answering service at night.  Our phone would ring, my father would answer it at all hours and would...

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Communicating about “Dr. Google”

Communicating about “Dr. Google”

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in Blog | 1 comment

In 2007 Scott Haig, an orthopedic surgeon, wrote “When a patient is a Googler” which was published in Time Magazine.  He describes a patient that he names Susan, the “queen of Googlers.” “Every doctor knows patients like this. They’re called ‘brainsuckers.'” His article praises patients that are nurses and...

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If It Ain’t Broke Don’t Fix It? OR How the US Got Its Cancer Care Crisis

If It Ain’t Broke Don’t Fix It?  OR How the US Got Its Cancer Care Crisis

Posted by on Sep 17, 2013 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Lung cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Prostate cancer | 0 comments

Did you know… In a study conducted in 2012, 69% of patients diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and 81% of those diagnosed with stage 4 colorectal cancer did not understand that chemotherapy was not at all likely to cure their cancer? That a national survey showed physicians asked patients what they want in their care only ½ the time? That patients ask...

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A Roadmap to the “New Normal:” Understanding Cancer Treatment’s Bumpy Ride

A Roadmap to the “New Normal:” Understanding Cancer Treatment’s Bumpy Ride

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, Leukemia, Lung cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Prostate cancer | 3 comments

So often people who undergo chemotherapy hear something like this from their family, friends or other well-wishers, “Thank goodness that’s over, now you can get on with your life. You can get back to normal.” Although it’s true that chemotherapy is over, the road that the patient is on is not smooth. There are important changes that caregivers and...

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