Coronary artery disease Posts on Medivizor
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Coronary artery disease Posts on Medivizor

Can anxiety and depressive disorders be triggered by myocardial infarction?

Posted by on Apr 13, 2017 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychiatrist-diagnosed psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular prognosis. The study determined that the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders was increased in patients after acute myocardial infarction.  Some background Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is more...

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Can diabetic status help in determining adverse events of acute coronary syndromes?

Posted by on Apr 4, 2017 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This study aimed to determine the timing of mortality and other non-fatal adverse events according to diabetic status and type of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). It was found that the type of ACS but not the diabetic status determines the timing of fatal and non-fatal adverse events. Some background Patients with diabetes mellitus...

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Can vitamin D levels affect mortality rates in heart attack survivors?

Posted by on Feb 12, 2017 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This study looked at the effect of vitamin D levels on mortality rates in patients who have survived a heart attack. The authors concluded that overly low or high levels of vitamin D significantly increased the risk of mortality in patients who have survived a heart attack. Some background When a coronary artery (the blood vessels...

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Chest pain: The prognoses of small vessel disease and vasospastic disease

Posted by on Dec 20, 2016 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This paper examined the long-term prognoses of small vessel disease (when the walls of the small arteries in the heart are damaged) and vasospastic disease (contraction of blood vessel). Researchers concluded that both conditions significantly increased mortality risks and the risk of a heart attack. Some background A coronary...

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Heavy physical exertion, anger and emotional upset are risk factors for a heart attack

Posted by on Nov 8, 2016 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This paper studied whether heavy physical exertion and emotional upset or anger could trigger a heart attack. Authors reported that these factors were associated with an increased risk of a heart attack. Some background Heavy physical exertion can be a temporary strain on the heart. Anger or emotional upset can also increase blood...

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Comparing anti-blood clotting therapies after a percutaneous coronary intervention

Posted by on Oct 29, 2016 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This paper studied what the optimal medical therapy after a percutaneous coronary intervention should be. Researchers concluded that dual therapy was associated with lower bleeding rates compared to triple therapy.  Some background A percutaneous coronary intervention is a non-surgical procedure done to improve blood flow to the...

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Optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting stent

Posted by on Oct 17, 2016 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This paper looked at the best duration for dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients who had a drug-eluting stent or a heart attack. Results showed that patients receiving safer, newer drug-eluting stents may have a minimum DAPT duration of 3 to 6 months. Researchers also noted that the extension of DAPT to more than 1 year...

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Guidelines for cholesterol treatment

Posted by on Oct 8, 2016 in Coronary artery disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell This paper reviews the recent United States guidelines on recommendations for managing cholesterol levels.  Some background High levels of cholesterol (type of fat) increases the risk of heart disease. Cholesterol levels can be changed, and medical treatment can help to lower cholesterol levels. Statins, for example, are a group...

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