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Sepsis Posts on Medivizor

Thanksgiving: Cancelled-And It’s Okay

Thanksgiving: Cancelled-And It’s Okay

Posted by on Dec 2, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Before becoming a heart recipient, Stephanie Zimmerman, RN, MSN was a nurse practitioner caring for pediatric cancer patients. Susceptibility to infections and rejection of the donated organ are two of the many side effects of undergoing a transplant. Stephanie shares her experiences on her blog: Living the Cure.  Guest post By Stephanie Zimmerman, RN,...

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What is Neutropenia?

What is Neutropenia?

Posted by on Jan 21, 2018 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, Leukemia, Lung cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Prostate cancer | 1 comment

There are 1.6 million people diagnosed with cancer in the US each year. Of these, 650,000 receive chemotherapy. Did you know that 60,000 people a year are hospitalized for neutropenia, a common side effect of chemotherapy? One in fourteen die because of it. Of the 650,000 receiving chemotherapy, 104,000 are not aware of neutropenia and 52,000 don’t...

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What is Sepsis?

What is Sepsis?

Posted by on Aug 25, 2015 in Blog | 1 comment

Recent stories from the  Sepsis Alliance website are alarming.  People are healthy one day, feel crummy the next, then either die, or spend a long time in ICUs to survive with “life changing challenges.” For example, Elden Bailey (age 47) told his sister one Friday that he “didn’t feel too good.” Two days later, he was admitted to ICU and...

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The Complex Patient, Sepsis, and a Digital App

The Complex Patient, Sepsis, and a Digital App

Posted by on Jan 5, 2014 in Blog, Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Lung cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Prostate cancer | 1 comment

(This post is by guest blogger Rann Patterson and contains her personal views and opinions). (Updated Jan 15, 2014: To correct error in identity of app highlighted). Cancer patients usually have lymph nodes removed during surgery. The lymphatic system can be thought of, by analogy, as a person’s “water system” and works in tandem with the...

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