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Posted by on Jan 20, 2020 in Stroke | 0 comments

In a nutshell

This study investigated the long-term effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of stroke survivors. Researchers suggested that ESWT is associated with improved outcomes in these patients.

Some background

A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain is cut-off. Brain cells stop receiving oxygen and begin to die. The abilities controlled by these cells are lost causing symptoms such as spasticity. Spasticity consists in the constant stiffness of muscles. SPA is present in 25% of patients 3 days after stroke. This condition is associated with worse movement, more pain, and limited activity.  

The standard treatment for spasticity is physical therapy and or medications. However, these treatments are of limited effectiveness. ESWT has been reported to be a good treatment option for these patients. However, these studies have limited information about symptoms such as pain.

Methods & findings

This study reviewed 8 other studies and included information about 301 patients who had a stroke. ESWT rehabilitation was compared to no therapy (control group) in these studies.

At long-term follow-up ESWT significantly reduced spasticity scores. It also improved other factors such as range of movement, balance, sensory and motor function, and pain.

The bottom line

This study concluded that ESWT is a good and safe option to treat spasticity and pain in stroke survivors.

The fine print

This study was based on information from medical records. Data may have been missing. Further studies are needed.

Published By :

Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of the National Stroke Association

Date :

Dec 31, 2019

Original Title :

Long-term Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Poststroke Spasticity: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

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