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Posted by on Jun 21, 2018 in Parkinson's Disease | 0 comments

In a nutshell

This study investigated the long-term satisfaction following deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). The study concluded that patients were satisfied with their decision to undergo DBS, however pre-operative expectations were high and were not associated with satisfaction post-surgery.

Some background

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one strategy to treat Parkinson's disease symtoms that are progressing despite medication. This involves surgically placing a probe called an electrode in specific part of the brain (such as the subthalamic nucleus). This electrode is connected to a power source outside the skull and delivers electrical signals to the probe. This can hels improve motor symptoms.

DBS leads to long-term improvement of motor symptoms (greater than 5 years). However, it is not clear if a patient’s quality of life also improves long-term.

Methods & findings

This study investigated the quality of life and long-term satisfaction following DBS surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease.

52 patients who underwent bilateral (both sides of brain) DBS were included in this study. Following surgery patients were assessed using a number of quality of life questionnaires. This was performed on average 8 years post-surgery.

65% of patients reported high satisfaction following surgery. 63.5% of patients would have preferred surgery at an earlier timepoint.

Reported long-term quality of life was lower following DBS surgery on the areas of mobility, emotional well-being, and social support. These results were associated with lower satisfaction of DBS.

The bottom line

The authors concluded that patients were satisfied with their decision to undergo DBS, however pre-operative expectations were high and were not associated with satisfaction post-surgery.

The fine print

These patients did not undergo assessment of their motor symptoms at this 8-year follow-up. The poorer satisfaction may be related to a worsening of symptoms as DBS does not cure Parkinson's disease. This study included a very small number of patients; further investigation is needed.

What’s next?

If you have any concerns regarding deep brain stimulation, please consult with you physician.

Published By :

Brain sciences

Date :

Apr 01, 2018

Original Title :

Long-Term Satisfaction and Patient-Centered Outcomes of Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease.

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