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Posted by on Jan 20, 2019 in Overactive bladder | 0 comments

In a nutshell

This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a long-acting acetaminophen-ibuprofen combination (Paxerol) for the treatment of nocturia associated with overactive bladder (OAB). This study found that Paxerol is a safe and effective treatment option for severe nocturia associated with OAB.

Some background

Overactive bladder (OAB) occurs when the bladder muscle is too active. Instead of staying at rest as urine fills the bladder, the bladder contracts. This causes a person to feel a sudden and sometimes overwhelming urge to urinate even when the bladder is not full. When this happens at night it is called nocturia. One treatment for OAB is Paxerol (acetaminophen and ibuprofen). 

The safety and effectiveness of Paxerol for treating severe nocturia in OAB are still under investigation. 

Methods & findings

This study included 86 patients who had severe nocturia. They were split into four groups. Groups 1-3 had low, medium and high doses of Paxerol. Group 4 had a placebo. Patients were followed up for 30 days. 

Groups 1-3 had significantly reduced nocturia compared to group 4. High dose Paxerol also led to a longer uninterrupted sleep as compared to placebo. 10.5% of all patients reported side effects such as urinary infection, nausea or abdominal pain.

The bottom line

This study found that Paxerol is a safe and effective treatment option for severe nocturia associated with OAB.

The fine print

This study had a very short follow-up period. Longer-term studies are needed.

Published By :

Neurourology and urodynamics

Date :

Dec 28, 2018

Original Title :
Novel immediate/sustained-release formulation of acetaminophen-ibuprofen combination (Paxerol®) for severe nocturia associated with overactive bladder: A multi-center, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled, 4-arm trial.
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