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Posted by on Aug 13, 2018 in Hypertension | 0 comments

In a nutshell

This study investigated if the use of blood pressure (BP)-interfering medication is common in patients hypertension. The study concluded that patients with new or treatment-resistant hypertension commonly take BP-interfering medication including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Some background

Managing BP is important in patients with hypertension (high blood pressure). Hypertension can lead to serious conditions including cardiovascular disease (heart and circulation). In some cases managing BP levels is difficult and cannot be achieved with lifestyle changes or medication.

Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is a growing problem. Identifying factors that cause TRH is important. One potential factor is BP-interfering medication. These are drugs that can alter BP levels or interact with drugs to treat hypertension (anti-hypertensives). It is unclear if patients with hypertension (either newly diagnosed or treatment-resistant) commonly take BP-interfering medication.

Methods & findings

This study included information on over 650,000 patients newly diagnosed with hypertension or with TRH. The authors analyzed each patient’s prescription history to determine what medications were taken. 

The most commonly prescribed BP-interfering medications were non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen and hormones. 18.3% of patients with new hypertension and 17.6% of patients with TRH started taking a BP-interfering drug following adjustment of their anti-hypertensive medication to improve BP control. Following this adjustment, 57.6% of new hypertension and 64.9% of TRH patients continued to take BP-interfering medication.

The bottom line

The authors concluded that patients with new or treatment-resistant hypertension commonly take BP-interfering medication including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

The fine print

There are a number of limitations to this study. It does not have any information on non-prescription drugs and the use of these can also alter BP medications. This study does not address if any of these BP-interfering medications cause clinically significant BP changes over time. 

What’s next?

If you have any questions regarding BP-interfering medication then please consult with your doctor. 

Published By :

American journal of hypertension

Date :

Jul 25, 2018

Original Title :
Use of Prescription Medications that Potentially Interfere with Blood Pressure Control in New-Onset Hypertension and Treatment-Resistant Hypertension.
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